Germany: NGG mobilizing against employer push for longer, ‘flexible’ hours in the hospitality sector

 Germany NGG mobilizing against employer push for longer flexible hoursThe German Food and Allied Workers Union NGG is mobilizing to defeat employer efforts to extend working time in the hospitality sector. The employer association is pushing for changes to the law which would extend the legal working day to up to 13 hours in hotels and restaurants and allow for employees to be sent home on short notice during slack times. The law currently establishes an 8-hour day with a maximum 2 additional hours of overtime.

The union is reaching out to hospitality workers with an initiative called ‘Du hast es fairdient’, a play on words which can be translated as ‘You’ve earned it fair and square’. Unpredictable scheduling and a further lengthening of the working day, along with chronically low pay, put worker health and safety at risk and endanger the quality of employment and the future of the sector, argues the union.

Through social media the NGG is reaching out to hospitality workers and inviting them to share their experiences working in the sector online as part of the campaign.

 

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